Increasing Wheel Width without losing Dyamics

Discussion in 'General Supra Topics' started by CantEven_Supra, Aug 12, 2018.

  1. CantEven_Supra

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    Hello!

    If this car comes thru with specs I like and a reasonable price I will be ordering one and the first aftermarket parts I will be getting is a set of adjustable lowering springs/coilovers and a set of aftermarket HRE wheels.

    I understand the car is not out yet, and wheel wells haven't been measured but the way it is looking (the rear especially) is we may have some solid room to fit some wider tires for a larger contact patch

    I guess this question doesn't necessarily need to pertain to the MK5 but rather all sports cars.

    When increasing wheel width what is a general good rule of thumb for not disrupting or ruining the handling dynamics of the car?

    However much I can increase the fronts (I am assuming the fronts will be the limiting factor) I increase the rears the same amount to keep the same ratio as the from factory setup? or do you just go as wide as you can front and back?

    Thx
    CE_S
     
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  2. Nurburgring

    Nurburgring Well-Known Member

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    Many factors to consider, specially in a car which is not yet available.
    If you keep the OEM ratio, it will probably maintain the OEM balance (which is usually understeer at the limit).

    If you go to a square setup (285 in all 4 corners for instance) it will tend towards a more aggresive, oversteering setup. Many S2000 owners that track their cars use this kind of tire setup +/- bigger front sway bar +/- rear wing. It works. But this is a very different platform: more power, torque vectoring LSD, it will probably take a while to figure the optimal track setup. And it will not be the same for autocross versus a large track. Driver preference is also relevant. So no clear cut answers... you´ll have to try it out and tell us :)
     
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  3. Guff

    Guff Moderator
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    Indeed, as @Nurburgring said, its tough to say right now. Tada-San has said in interviews that the car will have fully neutral chassis characteristics, in turn-in, mid-corner, and corner exit. Now considering the tire setup is already staggered, this very well could mean that an increase in front grip, while likely improving turn in, could lean to oversteer at the limit. That being said, the mechanical grip of this car is obviously high, with sticky 255/275 rubber, and as such the vast majority of driving will not actually see too much of a difference from +/-10-20mm tire width on either axle.

    And while the rears certainly do look like there is a lot of space to add tire, there may be an issue in the fronts with the factory strut/spring perch clearance. Again, we'll have to see once we can get our hands on the car!
     
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  4. OP
    OP
    CantEven_Supra

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    Thank you for the replies so far


    Guff; for sure the limiting factor will be the front tires (like most cars) with caution being the inner part of the tire / wheel hitting suspension setups.

    If I were to increase the front width the rear would definitely be increased to try and correct any change in handling. Just a thought I had to feed answers to before my mind exploded
     
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