CSF Radiators - Upgraded Heat Exchanger for 2020+ MKV Supra

geert.bieseman

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Ok so the CSF heat exchanger is on.

Ambient temps and weather conditions have been very unstable lately (high humidty and high temps)

Tried to compare the closest runs possible since I did not have a lot of meth only pulls and wanted meth against meth + heat exchanger

Meth only
4th gear pull start @ 3.5K - 6.5K
Start IAT 52c
End IAT 58c

Meth + Heat exchanger
4th gear pull start @ 3.5K - 6.5K
Start IAT 51c
End IAT 57c

After comparing a few pulls I did not notice any reduction in overall IAT just like @Twisted Tuning mentioned however, IAT temp drop between runs is much faster after letting off and cruising. It is much better in recovery now

This translates into a more consistent performing car overall in the heat here which is an added bonus

It does help :thumbsup:
Thanks for the comparison.
So seems that for track usage where the car is always under load... it is not making the IAT cooler.
Only cools down faster when after some fun, you cruise along :)





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Mark5825

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These results are a bit disappointing for track application. Is it possible AMS's will be any better? What other options are there to keep temps down other than meth?
 

kern417

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It seems the heat capacity of the system is unchanged which doesn’t surprise me as that seems to depend mostly on the inter cooler itself, but nice to see the higher cooling efficiency dissipates heat more quickly.
Thanks for the comparison.
So seems that for track usage where the car is always under load... it is not making the IAT cooler.
Only cools down faster when after some fun, you cruise along :)
I think this is the only issue I have with CSF's advertising. They claim it turns improves IATs from a curve upwards into a flat line, but really it doesn't. It has a small reduction in temps, but the big issue is recovery where the stock system will heat soak.

The DME does an amazing job of protecting the engine and compensating for temps. But I'd trust this on a track day. Yes IATs are important for all out power, but watching temps drop immediately after a pull should give a lot of confidence that any time you're not WOT (braking, maintaining speed in turn) that the temps are resetting to give you the best performance when you get back on the gas. And my pulls were from 40-140 when i did testing, which is not something you'd experience often on track.

Or, of course, you could just dial back boost for track days to keep temps down.
 

geert.bieseman

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I think this is the only issue I have with CSF's advertising. They claim it turns improves IATs from a curve upwards into a flat line, but really it doesn't. It has a small reduction in temps, but the big issue is recovery where the stock system will heat soak.

The DME does an amazing job of protecting the engine and compensating for temps. But I'd trust this on a track day. Yes IATs are important for all out power, but watching temps drop immediately after a pull should give a lot of confidence that any time you're not WOT (braking, maintaining speed in turn) that the temps are resetting to give you the best performance when you get back on the gas. And my pulls were from 40-140 when i did testing, which is not something you'd experience often on track.

Or, of course, you could just dial back boost for track days to keep temps down.
I don't kow how fast the temperatures would recover to a normal level, before you open again the throttle on a track.
Can't see that the temperatures lower that much in 2-3 seconds. Cause after that timing, you are again on 100% throttle.

Maybe good on a dragstrip, but I can't see the application on a 20 minute session on the track in 30 degrees celcius outside shade temperatures.
 

kern417

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I don't kow how fast the temperatures would recover to a normal level, before you open again the throttle on a track.
Can't see that the temperatures lower that much in 2-3 seconds. Cause after that timing, you are again on 100% throttle.

Maybe good on a dragstrip, but I can't see the application on a 20 minute session on the track in 30 degrees celcius outside shade temperatures.
In my logs temps drop 7-10* in 5 seconds. And that's after a 100mph pull. I don't know what tracks you run but the ones around here have multiple sweepers that last for a bit, and at most they have 2 straights that allow that kind of speed. But it's up to you.

Ultimately a bigger intercooler will just heat soak the antifreeze faster. You need a way to cool down the coolant too. So mine isn't going anywhere.:thumbsup:
 

geert.bieseman

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Tracks I would/could participate on (just as info):
  • Belgium Spa-Francorchamps
  • Belgium Zolder
  • Netherlands Zandvoort
  • France Dijon-Prenois
  • France LeMans
  • Austria Rebull Ring
Also the higher your speed, the 'colder the air' is (just stick your hand out the window at 50mph or ar 100mph). So fast tracks will better cool your car than low-speed tracks. But again, for this to check... you would nee live data to compare over the entire 20minute session (and not a 10-20sec).

Every fluid needs to stay within optimal temp ranges, we are not running track-made cars here :)
But I like discussing about it :)
 

a90moe

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Humidity cleared and wanted to compare IAT in stop & go traffic dry weather both days 48C temps

Left: CSF
Right: OEM

E0AA31DD-8A90-4C20-865E-0D993C74D9B3.jpeg


5C temp difference between the two :thumbsup:
 

A90_Freak

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Currently I’m installing the CSF heat exchanger and Koyo radiator on my supra .

I’m confused which coolant (antifreeze) fluid to use . I just visited BMW dealer and they have two different coolants. There is a green one and a blue one .

could someone guide me which coolant to use ? And what is the bmw part number for that ?
 

Bflood

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Currently I’m installing the CSF heat exchanger and Koyo radiator on my supra .

I’m confused which coolant (antifreeze) fluid to use . I just visited BMW dealer and they have two different coolants. There is a green one and a blue one .

could someone guide me which coolant to use ? And what is the bmw part number for that ?
You will need both green and blue. The heat exchanger and aux radiators operate on two different systems. I picked up the blue (bmw branded) from ecs and will be buying the green from a local autozone.
 

A90_Freak

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You will need both green and blue. The heat exchanger and aux radiators operate on two different systems. I picked up the blue (bmw branded) from ecs and will be buying the green from a local autozone.
could you guide me more . When I bought the CSF and Koyo they came without instructions ,therefore, i need some assistance.

what I understood is that there is two different fluids. One is green which is HT12 and the other one is blue (from BMW) .

which one is for the heat exchanger and which one is for the radiator? And could you point in the engine picture where should i fill each one of them ?

I’m little bit lost and i hope someone guide me please .
 

Bflood

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could you guide me more . When I bought the CSF and Koyo they came without instructions ,therefore, i need some assistance.

what I understood is that there is two different fluids. One is green which is HT12 and the other one is blue (from BMW) .

which one is for the heat exchanger and which one is for the radiator? And could you point in the engine picture where should i fill each one of them ?

I’m little bit lost and i hope someone guide me please .
I plan on doing the install this weekend. I'll try and take some pics as I go.
 

A90_Freak

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I plan on doing the install this weekend. I'll try and take some pics as I go.
I just installed both of them . But I didn’t put any fluids yet .

i just checked the service manual and they used only Frostox HT12 coolant (green one) on the supra .

should i use it to fill the CSF heat exchanger & Koyo radiator?
 

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